ENGLISH LANGUAGE PRIMARY SIX (6) THIRD TERM LESSON PLAN AND SCHEME OF WORK

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PRIMARY SIX (6) THIRD TERM LESSON PLAN AND SCHEME OF WORK



Lesson Notes / Scheme of work

Primary 1  |  Primary 2Primary 3

Primary 4 |  Primary 5Primary 6

JSS1JSS2  | JSS3

SSS1SSS2  |  SSS3

Question Bank

Primary 1 |  Primary 2  |Primary3

Primary 4  | Primary5 Primary6

JSS1JSS2 |  JSS3

SSS1SSS2  |  SSS3

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PRIMARY SIX (6) THIRD TERM LESSON PLAN AND SCHEME OF WORK

PRIMARY SIX THIRD TERM E-NOTE

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

 

WEEKS SUMMARY OF CONTENTS

  • Revision of second terms work ​​ 

 

2. A. Speech Work: Making verbal report and Statements​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and  ​​​​ Comprehension​​ C. Structure: Writing e-mail text messages ​​ D. Grammar: Comparison of verb ​​ E. Writing: Biography writing: Describe a person or  ​​​​ Thing so that everybody will readily recognize  ​​​​ Him/her/it ​​ F. Verbal Aptitude​​ 

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3. A. Speech Work: Giving formal speeches​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and  ​​​​ Comprehension​​ C. Structure: Main clauses with ‘if’ conditional  ​​​​ Clause D. Grammar: Informal letters further practice ​​ E. Writing: Auto biography: Description of oneself  ​​​​ Habit, taste, manner and moral qualities ​​ F. Verbal Aptitude​​ 

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4. A. Speech Work: Talking at interviews​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and  ​​​​ Comprehension​​ C. Structure: Informal letters: Further practice ​​ D. Grammar: Difference between pairs of sentence  ​​​​ The use of ‘in’ and ‘at’ ‘in’ in simple sentences correctly. ​​ E. Writing: Dictation of suitable passages ​​ F. Verbal Aptitude​​ 

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5. A. Speech Work: Reading valedictory speeches ​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meaning and  ​​​​ Comprehension​​ 

C. Structure: Review of some functional words ​​ D. Grammar: Review of guides to good essay writing ​​ E. Writing: Write informal letter ​​ F. Verbal Aptitudes​​ 

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6. A. Speech Work: Expressing wishes and  ​​​​ Suppositions ​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and  ​​​​ Comprehension ​​ C. Structure: Indefinite pronoun and indefinite  ​​​​ Adverbs ​​ D. Grammar: Singular and Plural ​​ E. Writing: My favorite sport ​​ F. Verbal Aptitude​​ 

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7. A. Speech Work: Pronunciation practice: phrases With two explosives e.g. a black bird, a heavy  ​​​​ Weight, a dark room. ​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meaning and  ​​​​ Comprehension ​​ C. Structure: Punctuation marks ​​ D. Grammar: Word bank and sentence building ​​ E. Writing: How I will spend my coming holidays ​​ F. Verbal Aptitude​​ 

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8. General Revision​​ 

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9. General Revision​​ 

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10. General Revision​​ 

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11. General Revision​​ 

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12. General Revision​​ 

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13. Examination​​ 

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Week: Two

Date:

Class: Basic Six

Subject: English Studies

Duration: 40 minutes​​ 

Topics:  ​​​​ A. Speech Work: Making verbal report and Statements ​​ 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and comprehension​​ 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ C. Structure: Writing e-mail text messages​​ 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ D. Grammar: Comparison of verb​​ 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ E. Writing: Biography writing: Describe a person or Thing so that everybody will readily recognize  ​​​​ Him/her/it

 

Behavioural objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to;

  • Describe a person or thing so that everybody will readily recognize him or it.

  • Change a direct speech to reported speech.

  • Write an email or text message to their friends or family.

  • Make a sentence with the new words

  • Write the meaning of new word/word bank in the passage.

 

​​ 

Instructional material/Reference material: Nigeria Primary English book 6 by F. Ademola- Adeoye, Q Adam et al.

Building Background/ Connection to prior knowledge: Pupils are familiar with the topics in their previous classes.

 

PERIOD 1:

MAKING VERBAL REPORT AND STATEMENT

Reported speech When a speech contains the exact words of a speaker, we call it direct speech. When the speech is reported by someone in his own words, it is called reported speech.As a general rule, the changes in the tense of the reported speech​​ depend upon the tense of the reporting verb in the direct speech. Thus when the reporting verb is in the past tense, the tense of the reported verb also changes to past tense.

Example

  • He said, ‘I want to go.’

  • He said that he wanted to go.

While reporting statements use a verb like tell.

  • Direct: He said, ‘I may meet you tomorrow.’

  • Indirect: He said that he might meet you tomorrow.

  • Direct: He said, ‘I will marry you only if you mend your ways.’

  • Indirect: He said that he would marry her only if she mended her ways.

  • Direct: He said, ‘I have decided not to buy the house because it is off the main road.’

  • Indirect: He said that he had decided not to buy the house because it was off the main road.

  • Direct: He said, ‘Ladies and gentleman, we must make this decision here and now.’

  • Indirect: He told his audience that they must / would have to make that decision there and then.

  • Direct: He said to his friend, ‘I have been worried about my daughter for some time. She is getting thinner and thinner.’

  • Indirect: He told his friend that he had been worried about his daughter for some time and that she was getting thinner and thinner.

 

 

Reported/indirect speech

Work with a partner. Act out this conversation between Oghome and Funmi.​​ 

Funmi: ‘I’d like to, but I must help my mum first. What time does it start?’

Oghome: ‘At 2 o’clock. I really want you to come’.

Oghome: ‘Can you come to my party on Saturday?’

Funmi: ‘I’m sure I’ll have finished by then. See you at the party. Bye!’

Write the conversation telling someone else what the two girls said. Example: ‘Oghome asked Funmi if she was coming to her party the following Saturday. Funmi told her that …’

 

ASSESSMENT

Change these sentences into reported speech. Remember to use the past tense.​​ 

1 ‘Why will our teacher be late tomorrow?’ Bola asked.​​ 

2 ‘How often do you say your prayers?’ Maryam asked her friend.​​ 

3 ‘What’s your name?’ the policeman asked the man.​​ 

4 ‘Would you like to play at my house next Saturday?’ Tayo asked Hauwa.

​​ 5 ‘When can you get the parts for my car?’ Dad asked the mechanic.​​ 

6 ‘Where is the Internet café, please?’ the stranger asked me.

 

PERIOD: 2

Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and comprehension

Communicating through e-mails E-mail means electronic mail. It is a way of exchanging messages in digital form from one writer to one or more recipients. E-mails operate through the Internet. ​​ Today’s e-mail systems are based on the store-and-forward model. E-mail servers accept, forward, deliver, and store messages. Users’ computers need not be online simultaneously. They only need to be connected briefly to a mail server (a computer that provides other computers with access to mail files) for as long as it takes to send and receive messages.

​​ An Internet e-mail message comprises three components – the message envelope, the message header, and the message body. The message header contains. the originator’s email address and one or more recipient’s addresses. There are many software platforms available to send and receive e-mails. Popular e-mail platforms include Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo mail, and Outlook. The e-mail is a highly effective and widely used form of business communication. Business organisations can reach a lot of people and give them information in a short time. It is inexpensive, requiring only an Internet connection. Storing and retrieving e-mail communication is easy to do as it is readily available in soft copy online. E-mails are a convenient and fast way of sending or sharing information, for example, to an entire workforce in an organisation, with just the click of a mouse. This can save money for the company. Furthermore, emails do not require paper. Hence they are environment-friendly because they save a lot of trees from being cut down for paper production. ​​ E-mails can also have pictures in them. You can send your birthday cards or newsletters as e-mail. You can also advertise your products on e-mail. ​​ E-mails have their own shortcomings. They may carry viruses. These are small programmes that can harm your computer system. Also, some people send unwanted e-mails, known as spams, to others.

Answer the following questions.​​ 

1. What is an e-mail?​​ 

2. How does e-mail work?​​ 

3. What name does the passage give the system that delivers and stores e-mails?​​ 

4. Name the three components of an Internet e-mail message.​​ 

5. Mention four e-mail platforms.​​ 

6. Mention three benefits of e-mail as a means of business communication.​​ 

7. Why are e-mails said to be environment-friendly?​​ 

8. How does the use of e-mails save money for a company?​​ 

9. Why is e-mail a fast means of communication?

​​ 10. What are viruses?

 

 

inexpensive  ​​ ​​​​ connected  ​​ ​​​​ accept  ​​ ​​​​ unwanted  ​​ ​​​​ effective  ​​​​ comprises  ​​ ​​​​ friendly simultaneously  ​​ ​​​​ briefly  ​​ ​​​​ convenient

Vocabulary

 

 

ASSESSMENT

Write out the meaning and antonyms of each of the words above.

 

PERIOD: 3

 

Structure: Writing e-mail and text messages​​ 

 

Texting (text messages) is a process of writing and sending an instant message to someone’s phone.

Email is is a process of writing and sending a message to someone’s email address.

MERITS OF WRITING E-MAIL AND TEXT MESSAGES

a. Rapid delivery because of urgency of the message to be sent.

b. Economy i.e. saving cost.

c. Clarity and completion of message.

Text messages​​ 

Study the following SMS (Short Message Service) abbreviations. They are used in writing text messages or SMS.​​ 

Abbreviations

Full text

2

To or two

Gr8

great

4

For

Idk

I don’t know

B4

Before

Imo

In my opinion

y

Why

 

ASSESSMENT

Study the text above again and write each of the following sentences in full. The first one has been done for you.

    • Ur a gr8 girl. Answer: ​​ You are a great girl.​​ 

    • ​​ AFAIK, my friends r having a party 2nite.​​ 

    • ​​ yw 2 dis gr8 event.​​ 

    • ​​ I’ll cu 2moro, thx.​​ 

    • ​​ Where’s ur dad working atm?​​ 

    • ​​ Pls send d msg b4 2moro.​​ 

    • Idk y many boys r rushing 2 the class.​​ 

    • ​​ I’m tryin 2 get sb 2 txt d msg 2 all our customers.

 

PERIOD 4:

Biography Writing

 

biography is a description of a real person's life, including factual details as well as stories from the person's life. ... The vast majority of biography examples are written about people who are or were famous, such as politicians, actors, athletes, and so on.

 

A biography highlights the key events that have happened in their life, sometimes talking about their childhood.

 

A biography can be written about someone who is dead or alive.

 

EXAMPLE OF BIOGRAPHY

NELSON MANDELA​​ 

Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, on July 18, 1918. He was the first member of his family to attend school. A Methodist teacher gave him the name “Nelson” at school. He continued in school and later attended the University of South Africa in Johannesburg. He became a lawyer representing those who would otherwise go without legal assistance. Mandela was first involved in nonviolent protests but was eventually arrested for treason and placed in prison. He was fighting against the apartheid and the treatment of his people. Apartheid was the practice of keeping the races separated in South Africa. Locked in his cell for years on end, Nelson’s spirit was not broken. Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in prison. Most of this time was spent in a tiny cell on Robben Island. His captivity became widely publicized. He was considered a terrorist when he was imprisoned, but as time wore on, it became apparent that he was treated unjustly in his fight to end apartheid. Once released from prison, Nelson Mandela went on to receive hundreds of awards. He received the Nobel Peace Prize which many felt was also a tribute to the people of South Africa as much as to him. On April 27, 1994, Nelson Mandela was elected President of South Africa. He served until 1999. He continued to work pushing for peace throughout the world. In South Africa, he is known as Madiba, which is an honorary title. Nelson Mandela continues to inspire many.​​ 

 

Presentation

Step I: Teacher revises the previous topic.

Step II: Teacher introduces the new topic.

Step III: Teacher explains the new topic and makes relevant illustrations.

​​ Step IV: Students give examples and make contribution.

​​ Step V: Teacher evaluates the students by asking questions

 

Evaluation:​​ 

  • Write the biography of a close relation e.g. father, brother or mother, etc.

Write a text message of not more than three sentences on each of the following topics.​​ 

  • The benefit of washing hands.​​ 

  • ​​ Inviting friends to a party.

  • Asking your parents to send your pocket money.

 

 

 

WEEK 3

Date:

Class: Basic Six

Subject: English Studies

Duration: 40 minutes​​ 

Topics:​​ 

A. Speech Work: Giving formal speeches ​​ 

B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and Comprehension​​ 

C. Structure: Main clauses with ‘if’ conditional  ​​​​ Clause​​ 

D. Grammar: Informal letters further practice ​​ 

E. Writing: Auto biography: Description of oneself Habit, taste, manner and moral qualities ​​ 

 

 

Behavioural objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to;

  • Express themselves orally.

  • Demonstrate good speech habits of clear pronunciation.

  • Write an autobiography.

  • Give examples of “if conditional clause”

Instructional material/Reference material: Nigeria Primary English book 6 by F. Ademola- Adeoye, Q Adam et al.

Informal letter chart, samples of autobiography.

Building Background/ Connection to prior knowledge: Pupils are familiar with the topics in their previous classes.

 

 

 

PERIOD 1

A. Speech Work: Giving formal speeches ​​ 

 

Speaking about the future

Work in groups of four. Discuss what you would like to do after you leave primary school. Think about:​​ 

EXERCISE 1

• being a good and useful citizen​​ 

• going to secondary school​​ 

• going to classes in the evening to learn a skill, like using computers​​ 

• learning a practical skill, such as mending a car

​​ • working on a farm, in a shop, etc.

EXERCISE 2

Write notes about what you would like to be when you grow up.

    • Describe what it means to you to be a good and useful citizen.​​ 

    • Describe the education you would need if you want to learn a skill. Is this at secondary school, college, or university? Is it a skill you can learn while you work in a job?​​ 

    • Describe the training or help you would need if you want to do something in sports or entertainment.​​ 

    • Describe problems you may have getting the opportunity to get the education or training you need.​​ 

    • Describe different ways you might have to deal with these problems.​​ 

    • Describe what you could do if you cannot have your first choice.

 

EXERCISE 3

Work in pairs (A and B). Make a formal speech to your class as follows:

  • A will introduce B.​​ 

  • B Use your notes to stand up and make a formal speech to your class about your hopes for the future. Describe your ambition, the problems you have, and how you might be able to solve them. Begin: ‘My future:  ​​ ​​​​ After Primary School, I would like to…’​​ 

  • 3 Swap roles.

 

PERIOD 2

Writing an autobiography​​ 

An autobiography is a written account of a person’s life written by that person. It is the story describing the life of a person that is told by the individual himself or herself. Let us see how we can write our own life’s story.

 

EXERCISE

Write the story of your life by answering the following questions and then arranging them into three paragraphs.​​ 

  • What is your full name?

  • When and where were you born and to which parents?​​ 

  • Who are your parents and your immediate family members?​​ 

  • What can you remember about your childhood days?

  • What can you say about the school(s) you have attended?​​ 

  • What are the interesting things you have enjoyed doing, especially with your friends at home and at school?​​ 

  • What very bad thing can you remember that has happened to you?​​ 

  • Do you like sports? Are you funny? What else can you say about yourself?​​ 

  • What do you think about life generally?​​ 

  • What have you learned about life? Don’t forget to give your autobiography a title, such as e.g. the story of my life.

 

 

PERIOD 3

Grammar: Informal letters further practice ​​ 

 

 

No.7 Edward​​ Street,  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

Victoria Estate,  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

Port Harcourt,  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

Rivers State.  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

20th​​ ​​ January, 2020

Dear Lucky,​​ 

Good day to you and your friends in school. I hope you are all feeling well. We are all very excited. Mr Nwagbara, our class teacher, has just told us about an essay competition for primary schools. The school that wins will receive three hundred thousand naira. I’m going to enter the competition and I’m already thinking about what I shall write.​​ 

My idea is to write about what I would do if I were a teacher. The first thing I would do is to make sure that my pupils come to school punctually, correctly dressed in uniforms, every day. That’s the first thing any visitor to the school would notice and it would be good for the image of the school. I’d make sure they comply with all the rules of the school.

​​ I would make my lessons very interesting and exciting by making sure that my pupils take part in demonstration and dramatisation during lessons. This would enable them to understand the lessons better. I’d organise extra lessons for pupils after school where they would revise what they had been taught and also prepare for what would be taught the next day. This would not only make them intelligent, but they would come first in any competition or public examination.​​ 

I would create a debating society in the school where the pupils would learn to speak good English and argue points well. I’d encourage them to take part in debates outside school. This would give them confidence to speak correctly in public.​​ 

It would not be all work. I would also encourage them to take part in sports and be good boys and girls.​​ 

I am sure I will win this competition. If I win, the money will be for the school. Mr Nwagbara wants us to give him some suggestions about how the school use the money. Do you think I should suggest that we need football and basketball fields?​​ 

Please, write to let me know if you will also enter the essay competition. I would love to know what you would do if you were a teacher.  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

​​          Yours sincerely,  ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

​​          Udeme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXERCISE

Study Lucky’s letter again and then write a letter to your own friend telling them what you would do if you were a teacher, using the ideas below.​​ 

1. How would you make your pupils outstanding?

2. How would you make your pupils enjoy your lessons?​​ 

3. What other things would you introduce in your class?​​ 

4. How many societies would you create?

 

 

 

PERIOD 4

 

Main clauses with ‘if’ conditional  ​​​​ Clause

 

We have learned four kinds of sentences using ‘if’:​​ 

  • what will happen if something else happens: If + present simple tense .... + ​​ ‘will’/’be going to’/modals ...: If you work hard, you will pass the exam. If you don’t try, you might be sorry.

  • when things are impossible, not true, or imagined: ‘If’ + past simple tense.... + ‘would’ + verb: If I had the money, I would buy a computer. If I could go, I would visit Akwette.​​ 

  • things that did not happen because something else did not happen first: ‘If’ + past perfect tense ... + would have + verbs in past form: If he had run faster, he would have won the race. If I had seen the bus, I would not have had an accident.​​ 

  • to explain facts, truths, and habits: ‘If’ + present simple tense ... + present tense ​​ ... ‘If’ you mix blue and yellow paint, you get green. Ask your teacher if you don’t know the answer.

 

Fill in the gaps with the correct forms of the verbs in these sentences.​​ 

Example:​​ If anyone..... (ask), say I .... (be) with my auntie.

​​ If anyone asks, say that I am with my auntie.

 

  • If Dad..... (have) the right tools, he .... ​​ (mend) the window.​​ 

  • If they..... (go) to school yesterday, they ..... ​​ (meet) our headmaster.​​ 

  • When the rain..... (fall), the grass ..... ​​ (grow) taller.​​ 

  • He..... (finish) washing up quicker if you ..... ​​ (help) him.

 

 

 

Presentation

Step I: Teacher revises the previous topic.

Step II: Teacher introduces the new topic (s).

Step III: Teacher explains the new topic and makes relevant illustrations.

​​ Step IV: Students give examples and make contribution.

​​ Step V: Teacher evaluates the students by asking questions

 

 

 

WEEK 4

 

Date:

Class: Basic Six

Subject: English Studies

Duration: 40 minutes​​ 

Topics:​​ 

A. Speech Work: Talking at interviews​​ 

B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and Comprehension​​ 

C. Structure: Informal letters: Further practice​​ 

D. Grammar: Difference between pairs of sentence ​​ 

The use of ‘in’ and ‘at’ ‘in’ in simple sentences correctly.​​ 

E. Writing: Dictation of suitable passages​​ 

​​ 

 

 

Behavioural objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to;

  • Present an oral interviews with their colleagues.

  • Make sentences with the new words.

  • Identify the features of informal letter and equally write a letter to a pen friend.

  • Make use of “in” and “at’’ appropriately.

Instructional material/Reference material: Nigeria Primary English book 6 by F. Ademola- Adeoye, Q Adam et al.

Samples of informal letters, dictionary.

Building Background/ Connection to prior knowledge: Pupils are familiar with the topics in their previous classes.

 

 

 

PERIOD 1

TALKING AT INTERVIEWS

 

Readthisconversationsilently. Decide howyou would fill in the gaps.Now read the conversationto your partner, filling in the gaps.​​ 

A: Hello. Thank you for letting me interview you.

​​ B: It’s nice to be here.​​ 

A: Can you tell us some facts about yourself?​​ 

B: OK. My name is … and my family comes from …… I like school and my best subject is ... When I am not at school, I like ... best. My favourite … is … When I grow up, I want to be a …​​ 

A: Thank you very much.

 

Exercise​​ 

Practice this with a friend in front of the class.

 

Workwith a partner. One of you is a teacher and the other a pupil. Act this conversation together. Then change parts.

​​ Teacher: (As he sits down) Good morning. Please sit down.

​​ Pupil:​​ Thank you, (name of teacher). (sits down)​​ 

Teacher: What would you like to be when you are grown up?​​ 

Pupil:​​ I would like to be a nurse.​​ 

Teacher:​​ So, what will you do when you leave Primary School?​​ 

Pupil:​​ I will go to the Secondary School and I will work very hard. Then I will go  ​​​​ to college and later work in a clinic or hospital.

​​ Teacher:​​ Why do you want to be a nurse?

​​ Pupil: I would like to be a nurse because I enjoy helping people and looking after  ​​​​ them. I can also work in another country.​​ 

Teacher: Well, you must pass your exams first. Are you working hard?​​ Pupil: Yes, I am doing all my class work and homework.

​​ Teacher: Is there anything you would like to ask me?​​ 

Pupil: Yes, please. How would my family apply for my entry into the Secondary?

 

 

 

​​ 

PERIOD 2

 

Reading: Teaching of new words, meanings and Comprehension

 

Protection of the environment

​​ (NPE BK 6, pg. 262)​​ 

​​ 

 

 ​​​​ Vocabulary​​ 

Study these words and phrases. Listen to your teacher pronounce each one and then repeat.

degraded  ​​ ​​ ​​​​ gas flaring  ​​ ​​ ​​​​ extinction  ​​​​ global warming  ​​ ​​ ​​​​ encroachment  ​​ ​​​​ inhabit impenetrable  ​​ ​​​​ polluted  ​​ ​​ ​​​​ restrain adversely habitats indiscriminately

 

 

​​ 

 

 

 

 

 

PERIOD 3

 

Grammar: Difference between pairs of sentence ​​ 

The use of ‘in’ and ‘at’ ‘in’ in simple sentences correctly.​​ 

The prepositions of location at, in, on are a bit more complicated than basic position preposition. Location prepositions are associated with specific types of locations, which must be memorized.

Preposition

Locations

at

specific locations, addresses, companies, stores, events, parties, desks, counters

in

enclosed spaces, buildings, organizations, regions, water, deserts, mountain ranges, forests, cities, countries, continents, the sky, space, cars, groups of people, little boats

 

To help you understand the types of locations listed above, here are some real-life examples of at, in and on to get you started. There is a discussion of aboard further down the page.

At

In

On

at work

in class

on the floor

at home

in college

on the ground

at the bank

in the hospital

on the freeway

at the beach

in my car

on the lawn

at 123 Main Street

in a taxi

on the subway

at IKEA

in a canoe

on the Titanic

at the party

in the sky

on the plane

at the bus stop

in the universe

on Mount Everest

at the ticket counter

in the army

on the stairs

at my desk

in the Rocky Mountains

on Mars

at the dinner table

in the Pacific

on the shore

at the exit

in the crowd

on the sidewalk

at the supermarket

in the theater

on the balcony

at the wedding

in China

on Catalina Island

at the post office

in Africa

on his motorcycle

At School vs. In School

It's important to remember that each preposition expresses an idea. For example, at​​ expresses the idea of being at a specific location, whereas in expresses the idea of being in an institution. For this reason, at school and in school have two very difference meanings. Take a​​ look at the examples below to understand the difference.

Examples:

  • Precious wasn't at home; he was at school. at that location

  • Friday doesn't have a job yet because he is still in school. enrolled in the institution of school

 

​​ EXERCISE

1. We have high-speed Internet access  work, but I have a bad connection home.

2. The kids are learning about the Civil War 
 their history class  school.

3. Toby was 
 the hospital for two weeks after his motorcycle accident  the freeway.

4. Jane and Debbie saw dolphins 
 the ocean while they were having a picnic  the beach.

 

 

PERIOD 4;

 

Informal letters​​ 

Study the meanings of the following words that have to do with informal letters.​​ 

Address: The details of the place where someone lives or works, which  ​​​​ you use to send them letters.

​​ First name:​​ The name that comes before your family name (or surname).

​​ Personal letter:​​ A letter written to people close to you.​​ 

Stamp: A piece of paper, which pays for the postal services that you buy and stick onto an envelope before posting it.​​ 

Envelope:​​ A thin paper cover in which you put and send a letter.​​ 

Occasion: ​​​​ An important social event or ceremony.​​ 

Affectionately:​​ Showing that you love someone and care about them. ‘Yours  ​​​​ affectionately’ is sometimes used to conclude an informal letter.​​ 

Sincerely:​​ If a person feels or believes something sincerely, then they really  ​​​​ feel or believe it and not just pretending. ‘Yours sincerely’ is used  ​​​​ to end a letter written to someone, especially a letter that you  ​​​​ have begun by using the person’s name.​​ 

Relatives:​​ Members of one’s family.​​ 

Classmate:​​ Members of the same class in a school, college, or university.​​ 

Introduction:​​ The beginning of a letter or essay.​​ 

Body:​​ The central or main part of a letter or essay, where the subject matter or the main message of the letter or essay is discussed.​​ 

Reply:​​ Something said, written, or done as a way of responding or replying to a letter.​​ 

​​ 

Use some of the words above to correctly fill in the gaps in the following sentences.

  • ​​ You need to stick a 10 naira ___________ to that letter before posting it.​​ 

  • ​​ My father saves some drinks for a special ___________.

  • ​​ There was a large gathering of friends and ___________ at the party.​​ 

  • Adeola, Mustapha, and Obi are all ___________ in the school.​​ 

  • Which ___________ should I send the letter to?​​ 

  • You can end a personal letter with yours ___________ or yours ___________.

  • We haven’t received a ___________ to our letter.

  • ​​ His ___________ is Femi, but I don’t know his surname. Exercise

 

 

 

Presentation

Step I: Teacher revises the previous topic.

Step II: Teacher introduces the new topic.

Step III: Teacher explains the new topic and makes relevant illustrations.

​​ Step IV: Students give examples and make contribution.

​​ Step V: Teacher evaluates the students by asking questions

 

 

 

 

WEEK 5

Date:

Class: Basic Six

Subject: English Studies

Duration: 40 minutes​​ 

Topics:​​ 

A. Speech Work: Reading valedictory speeches ​​ 

B. Reading: Teaching of new words, meaning and Comprehension​​ 

C. Structure: Review of some functional words ​​ 

D. Grammar: Review of guides to good essay writing​​ 

​​ E. Writing: Write informal letter.

​​ 

 

Behavioural objectives: At the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to;

  • Read speeches presented at the end of the – in schools, clubs, etc.

  • Explain the features of an essay.

  • Write a well- structured essay.

  • Write an informal letter.

  • Write different types of letters to suit different situations.

Instructional material/Reference material: Nigeria Primary English book 6 by F. Ademola- Adeoye, Q Adam et al.Informal letter chart, audio of Valedictory speech,​​ Pictures,​​ Charts, Real objects.

 

Building Background/ Connection to prior knowledge: Pupils are familiar with the topics in their previous classes.

 

 

PERIOD 1

 

​​ Speech Work: Reading valedictory speeches ​​ 

 

Speech at The First Graduation Ceremony of Primary 6 Students at the Academic Community Hall, Baptist University

Speech by Mrs. Fanny Law, GBS, JP

Permanent Secretary for Education and Manpower at the First Graduation Ceremony of Primary 6 Students​​ at the Academic Community Hall, Baptist University

On Wednesday, 12 July 2006

 

 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ Professor Spinks, Mr Wong, Principal Chan, Honourable Guests, Parents, Teachers and Students,

     I am delighted to join you at the first graduation ceremony of the HKUGA Primary School .  Founded in 2001, the school is among the first group of schools established after the education reform was officially launched in October 2000.  Under the visionary leadership of the founding principal, Ms Gloria Leung, the school has risen to fame within a short time.  Today, it is one of the most popular primary schools in Hong Kong with a long list of admirers. 

     Since its establishment, the school has made continuous efforts to realize its vision and mission of nurturing “lively, inquiring, discerning and creative students”.  Appropriate measures have been put in place to develop an innovative and balanced curriculum, and a professional learning community among teachers.  The school rightly attaches importance to the pursuit of personal growth, aesthetic appreciation, a positive outlook and appreciation for others as the priority.

     Indeed, primary education is the foundation years during which students should develop good study habits, moral values, reflective ability, self-discipline, and the basic learning skills, i.e. literacy, numeracy, thinking and IT skills.  They should learn to respect others, and take responsibility for their own learning.   These attributes are far more important than scoring a few more points in school examinations.  Now that the HKUGA has provided a “through train” to secondary education for students from the primary school, there is more scope for whole-person development to prepare students better for secondary education where there is much more substantive learning of subject matters and higher demand on critical thinking ability. 

     In my many encounters with your students, I witness in them the joy of learning and excitement of exploring new things.  I am glad to see the vision of the education reform being realized in HKUGA Primary School where students are nurtured to be self-directed learners who enjoy learning, where students have the space and freedom to develop their individual interests and potentials, where teachers take pride in and derive satisfaction from teaching, and where parents are supportive of the school and respectful to teachers. 

     Dear students, you are the first group to graduate from this school.  I am glad to see that you have realized your Headmistress’s projected images of you four years ago, i.e. a group of confident youngsters, independent learners and problem-solvers.

     May I take this opportunity to share with you a 14th Century story of “Robert Bruce and the Spider”.  The tale sets its scene on an island when Robert Bruce, the Scottish leader, was in exile.  He was disappointed that his last castle had been taken over by the English, his wife imprisoned and his brother killed.  When lying on bed, trying to see if he should give up all attempts to restore freedom to Scotland, he noticed a spider hanging from the roof of the cabin on a long thread.  The spider was trying to swing itself from one roof beam to another, to secure the thread for spinning its web.  On the spider’s sixth unsuccessful attempt, Bruce had a comparison with his own situation: he had fought six battles against the English without success.  Despite repeated failures, the spider continued, inspiring Bruce to his subsequent victories in Scotland.  This is an example of perseverance that I would like to share with you.

     Graduates, while I congratulate you for your achievements, I wish that you would continue to try your very best in learning with perseverance, commitment and enjoyment.

Thank you.

 

ASSESSMENT

Read and master the valedictory speech.

 

 

PERIOD 2​​ 

 

The following types of essay can be identified;

  • Narrative essay

  • Descriptive essay

  • Argumentative essay

  • Expository essay.

1. ​​ Narrative Essay: This is a type of essay that tells a story or gives account of what has happened. ​​ Narrative writing is an art of story-telling and this has to be mastered. It should be noted that the story being related or narrated may be real or imagined, but it must be credible. It is the past tense form of verbs that are used.

​​ 2.​​ Descriptive Essay: ​​ It is one that is written to give the reader a mental picture of a person, an object or a place. The composition should be written in such a way that the reader will have a good picture of the person, place or object in his mind. E.g. “Describe your school compound for someone who has not been there”.

3.​​ Argumentative Essay: This is an essay which requires the writer to present a subject or an issue that ​​ has two sides with a view to persuading or convincing the reader to see the issue from has seen it ​​ and so agree with the point of view being presented . It is a composition written to argue that an opinion is superior to some other opinion. It is an essay written to persuade the reader to accept one opinion and reject some other opinion. It is commonly called Debate E.g. “Dry Season is Preferable to Rainy Season in Nigeria”

4.​​ Expository Essay: It is a composition that describes​​ how​​ something is done, planned or organized, made, how something works etc. E.g. “Describe how your favourite meal is prepared” or “The Game I like best”.

 

Guides to Expository Essay

  • Introductory paragraphs can be definition of the topic scientific fact, a philosophical statement, a proverb or a rhetorical question.​​ 

  • Transitory paragraphs you can compare and contrast illustration to buttress your ideas; causes and effects depending on the topic. Make use connectors to create unity and coherence between ideas and paragraphs.​​ 

  • Concluding paragraph: summarize in a nutshell and state your opinion or candid advice.

 

Guides to Argumentative Essay

 

  • Be persuasive​​ 

  • Argue only in favour of one side; make use of rhetorics.

  • Use sentence variety.

  • To oppose a generally held opinion, you must do a lot of thinking.

  • ​​ To score a good mark, your points must not be less than three because the total points can be four.​​ 

  • Your points must tally with your conclusion.

 

Guides to Descriptive essay

 

  • You are painting a picture of what you want to describe.​​ 

  • ​​ It can be a person, an event, a place or a thing.​​ 

  • ​​ A good descriptive composition will enable you identify the very thing when seen.​​ 

  • The tense form can either be in the present simple or past simple.​​ 

  • ​​ Sentences should be well linked, shown in paragraphs with appropriate connectors to create coherence.​​ 

  • The concluding paragraph is as important as the introductory paragraph.

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT

  • Write an essay on how to prepare your favourite food.

  • Write in support or against the motion “COVID-19 has been a Blessing in Disguise.

 

 

 

PERIOD 3

Informal Letters 

An informal letter. e.g. A letter to an elder sister, a brother, a father, a mother, a friend.

Features of informal letter: Letter to a friend is based on: tolerance, humaneness, personal in tone, intimate with secret/gossip, to share and enjoy warmth.

 

Format informal Letters

There is no set format when writing an informal letter. But there is a general pattern that people usually follow.

Sender address 

6, Kassim​​ Street,

Moshood​​ Road,​​ Ikeja,

Lagos.

7th​​ January, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                 

 

 

Greetings

Dear Dad, Uncle, Dapo…..

Body of the letter 

First paragraph – introduction

Second paragraph – Main content of the letter

Third,

Fourth, if any

Last paragraph – Conclusion

End of the letter 

Lots of Love

Best,

Best Wishes,

Kind Regards,

Kindly,

 

ASSESSMENT

1. Identify types and formats of letters;

2. Write different types of letters (formal and informal) to suit different situations.

 

PERIOD 4

 

Teaching of new words, meaning and Comprehension

 

Comprehension passage: Greed does not pay​​ (page 216-218)

 

 

Presentation

Step I: Teacher revises the previous topic.

Step II: Teacher introduces the new topic.

Step III: Teacher explains the new topic and makes relevant illustrations.

​​ Step IV: Students give examples and make contribution.

​​ Step V: Teacher evaluates the students by asking questions.

 

 

 

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